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Compassion Fatigue Workshop for Helping Professionals

  • Nashville Institute for Faith and Work 818 18th Ave South, 10th Floor Nashville, TN 37203 (map)
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If your work involves hearing stories of others' trauma and suffering - health care professionals and support staff, educators, therapists and counselors, addiction workers, family court lawyers and judges, journalists, humanitarian workers, first responders, social service providers, clergy and pastoral care workers, and others - this is the workshop for you.

  • When: Saturday, November 23, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

  • Where: The NEW NIFW Office (818 18th Ave South, 10th Floor, Nashville TN, 37203)

  • Price: 

    • General Admission: $129

    • Full-time Nonprofit Employee: $89

    • Scholarships available. Email sbradley@nifw.org for more information.

  • Leader: Eleanor Wells

There is a cost for caring. Compassion Fatigue is REAL – your compassion can become fatigued, worn out, used up. Compassion Fatigue (CF) can lead to symptoms and feelings of apathy, cynicism, depression, withdrawal, loss of a sense of humor, being unable to let go of work, loss of joy in your work… just to name a few.  

BUT prevention and cure are also REAL. Self-compassion and caring for self can combat and prevent Compassion Fatigue. 

The goal of this workshop is to:

  • Define CF and explain the differences between CF, secondary trauma and burnout

  • Identify your current CF risk and personal early warning signs

  • Assess your current level of self-care

  • Learn positive, practical strategies for reducing CF risk

  • Create a personal plan for self-care

The instructor of this course is a Compassion Fatigue Educator through the Green Cross Academy of Traumatology and is also a Certified Personal Development Coach. Eleanor graduated from NIFW’s intensive faith and work Gotham program.

 “The expectation that we can be immersed in suffering and loss daily and not be touched by it, is as unrealistic as being able to walk through water without getting wet.”

Dr Rachel Remen, MD